International Review of Education

, Volume 46, Issue 6, pp 599–620 | Cite as

Combining Work and Learning in the Informal Economy: Implications for Education, Training and Skills Development

  • Madhu Singh
Article

Abstract

Although education is identified as a key determinant of economic development and poverty eradication, this relationship is only possible when educationists are able to provide a comprehensive picture of the educational process in working life. In this paper it is argued that if systems of education and training are to cater to both the formal and the informal labour markets, then they need to take into account the traditions and values of the system of vocational learning in working life, cater to the requirements of local development and be based on an understanding of the kinds of competencies people in the informal economy want, need and utilise, the socio-economic and cultural contexts within which they work, and how they cope and sustain their livelihood strategies.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madhu Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCO Institute for EducationHamburgGermany

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