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Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 295–331 | Cite as

Ceramic Technology and Social Boundaries: Cultural Practices in Kalinga Clay Selection and Use

  • Miriam T. Stark
  • Ronald L. Bishop
  • Elizabeth Miksa
Article

Abstract

This study examines cultural sources of variation in ceramic compositional patterning in two pottery-making villages of the highland Philippines. In Dalupa, many potters are part-time specialists whereas in Dangtalan, women make pottery less frequently. Previous studies show that both pottery form and decoration correspond well with Kalinga social boundaries, but how do morphological and decorative patterning relate to compositional variability? Although researchers have made substantial advances in our understanding of natural and postdepositional sources of compositional variability, little is known about behavioral factors that affect chemical and mineralogical compositional patterning. This study examines cultural practices of clay selection and use in an ethnographic setting, and undertakes technical analyses to assess the relationship between behavior and material culture patterning. Our study identified paste differences between the clays and fired ceramics from Dangtalan and those from Dalupa. Findings from our compositional research thus parallel earlier morphological and stylistic studies, and illustrate multivariate differences in ceramics from these two Kalinga communities. This ethnoarchaeological and analytical project contributes, therefore, to understanding objective parameters within a behavioral context. It also provides an example of how a combined characterization approach, using chemical and petrographic techniques, can yield insights on intraregional variation at a finer scale of resolution than is often attempted.

ceramic composition quantitative petrography ethnoarchaeology social boundaries 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miriam T. Stark
    • 1
  • Ronald L. Bishop
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Miksa
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Hawai'iHonolulu
  2. 2.Center for Materials Research and EducationSmithsonian InstitutionWashington
  3. 3.Center for Desert ArchaeologyTucson

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