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Human Ecology

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 605–629 | Cite as

Shifting Cultivation and Conservation of Biological Diversity in Tripura, Northeast India

  • A. K. Gupta
Article

Abstract

Shifting cultivation (jhooming) has been identified as one of the main human impacts influencing biodiversity in Tripura, Northeast India. Over the last few years a new class of shifting cultivators has emerged that has adopted non-traditional forms of jhooming, which have been responsible for the loss of biological diversity in the state. This paper describes the successes achieved by the state government in providing the jhumias (tribes practicing jhooming) with various non-jhooming options. Recommendations include the need for short and long term control measures, improvement of existing jhooming methods, and integration of traditional knowledge with new practices.

shifting cultivation biological diversity conservation Northeast India Tripura 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. K. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.Wildlife Research Group, Department of AnatomyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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