Quality of Life Research

, Volume 8, Issue 1–2, pp 79–91

The development of an individualized questionnaire measure of perceived impact of diabetes on quality of life: the ADDQoL

  • C. Bradley
  • C. Todd
  • T. Gorton
  • E. Symonds
  • A. Martin
  • R. Plowright
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1026485130100

Cite this article as:
Bradley, C., Todd, C., Gorton, T. et al. Qual Life Res (1999) 8: 79. doi:10.1023/A:1026485130100

Abstract

The objectives of the study were to design and develop a questionnaire to measure individuals' perceptions of the impact of diabetes on their quality of life (QoL). The design of the ADDQoL (Audit of Diabetes Dependent QoL) was influenced by patient-centred principles underlying the SEIQoL interview method. Respondents rate only personally-applicable life domains, indicating importance and impact of diabetes. Fifty-two out-patients with diabetes and 102 attending diabetes education open days provided data for psychometric analyses. Each of the 13 domain-specific ADDQoL items was relevant and important for substantial numbers of respondents. Factor analysis and Cronbach's α coefficient of internal consistency (0.85) supported combination of items into a scale. Insulin-treated patients reported greater impact of diabetes on QoL than tablet / diet-treated patients. People with microvascular complications showed, as expected, greater diabetes-related impairment of QoL than people without complications. Unlike other QoL measures, the ADDQoL is an individualized questionnaire measure of the impact of diabetes and its treatment on QoL. Preliminary evidence of reliability and validity is established for adults with diabetes. Findings suggest that the ADDQoL will be more sensitive to change and responsive to differences than generic QoL measures.

Quality of life diabetes specific patient centred individualized psychometrics. 

Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Bradley
    • 1
  • C. Todd
    • 2
  • T. Gorton
    • 1
  • E. Symonds
    • 1
  • A. Martin
    • 2
  • R. Plowright
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Royal HollowayUniversity of LondonEghamUK
  2. 2.Health Services Research Group, Department of Community Medicine, Institute of Public HealthUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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