Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 269–298

Family-Based Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse: Knowns and Unknowns

  • Timothy J. Ozechowski
  • Howard A. Liddle
Article

Abstract

Family-based therapy is one of the most thoroughly studied treatments for adolescent drug abuse. Considerable empirical support exists for the efficacy of family-based therapy in curtailing adolescent drug use and cooccurring behavior problems. This article extends knowledge of the effects of family-based therapy for adolescent drug abuse by reviewing 16 controlled trials and 4 therapy process studies from a treatment development perspective. We articulate “knowns and unknowns” regarding the outcomes of treatment as well as the components, processes, mechanisms, moderators, and boundaries of effective family-based therapy for adolescent drug abuse. The review highlights areas of progress and future research needs within the specialty of family-based therapy for adolescent drug abuse.

adolescent drug abuse family-based therapy treatment outcome treatment development 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. Ozechowski
    • 1
  • Howard A. Liddle
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse (M711), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse (M711), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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