Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 249–253 | Cite as

GADD45γ, down-regulated in 65% Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) from 23 Chinese patients, inhibits cell growth and induces cell cycle G2/M arrest for Hepatoma Hep-G2 cell lines

  • Luhong Sun
  • Ruomu Gong
  • Bo Wan
  • Xinghua Huang
  • Chaoqun Wu
  • Xirang Zhang
  • Shouyuan Zhao
  • Long Yu
Article

Abstract

Growth-arrest and DNA-damage inducible (GADD) genes and Myeloid differentiation primary response (MyD) genes represent a family of genes that play a key role in negative control of cell growth. In the present study, following clone and location of human GADD45 γ (MyDL) gene, we have found that its mRNA expression level was down-regulated in 15/23 cases of clinic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by comparing the northern hybridization results between the tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Transient transfection of GADD45 γ cDNA with intact open reading frame sequence into the human hepatoma cells Hep-G2 resulted in dramatic growth suppression in colony formation assays. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis indicated that GADD45 γ caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition when transfected into Hep-G2 cells. Therefore, the possible role of GADD45 γ in cell growth control was further confirmed in this paper.

colony formation gene expression growth inhibition 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luhong Sun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ruomu Gong
    • 2
  • Bo Wan
    • 2
  • Xinghua Huang
    • 2
  • Chaoqun Wu
    • 2
  • Xirang Zhang
    • 1
  • Shouyuan Zhao
    • 2
  • Long Yu
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Life ScienceNanjing Normal UniversityNanjingP. R. China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life ScienceFudan UniversityShanghaiP. R. China

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