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Eating Disorders in Men: Current Considerations

  • Jeffery A. Harvey
  • John D. Robinson
Article

Abstract

Over the past two decades, there has been a change in the way men think about their bodies. The media portrays images of men with muscular bodies and a “six pack” abdomen. These images can create body dissatisfaction in males. With the change in the way that the media and society in the United States look at men, so has the drive for men to achieve this ideal body image. Eating disorders, body dysmorphia, and strict exercise and diet regimens seem to plague young men as do the images in advertisements. Although eating disorders in men are similar to what women experience, men seem to strive for more body mass whereas women try to obtain thinness. Gay men and heterosexual men seem to experience eating disorders in the same way although there are differences between how they perceive their bodies. This paper outlines how the media contributes to body dissatisfaction in men. In addition to understanding how the media affects men, it is important to review and possibly revise out understanding of eating disorders and body dysmorphia symptoms to gain a solid understanding of how these symptoms appear in men today.

eating disorders men body dysmorphia ideal body image body dissatisfaction media current trends diet exercise 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffery A. Harvey
    • 1
  • John D. Robinson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryHoward University HospitalWashington
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryHoward University HospitalWashington

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