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Factor Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory—II in a Medical Outpatient Sample

  • Jodi L. Viljoen
  • Grant L. Iverson
  • Stephanie Griffiths
  • Todd S. Woodward
Article

Abstract

This study examined the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory—II (BDI-II) in a sample of 127 individuals referred by their primary care physicians. Using exploratory factor analysis with oblique rotation, a 2-factor model appeared to be the most parsimonious representation of the data. The rotated factors accounted for approximately 53% of the variance. Consistent with previous research, the first factor was interpreted as a somatic–affective dimension and the second factor reflected a cognitive dimension. The correlation between these 2 factors was .79. It appears possible to divide the BDI-II into subscales to facilitate interpretation in medical patients.

Beck Depression Inventory—Second Edition factor analysis depression 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jodi L. Viljoen
    • 1
  • Grant L. Iverson
    • 1
  • Stephanie Griffiths
    • 1
  • Todd S. Woodward
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Medicine and Research, Riverview HospitalPort CoquitlamCanada

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