Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 377–386 | Cite as

Project SafeCare: Improving Health, Safety, and Parenting Skills in Families Reported for, and At-Risk for Child Maltreatment

  • Ronit M. Gershater-Molko
  • John R. Lutzker
  • David Wesch

Abstract

Project SafeCare was a 4-year, in-home, research and intervention program that provided parent training to families of children at-risk for maltreatment, and families of children who were victims of maltreatment. Parents were trained in treating children's illnesses and maximizing their own health-care skills (Health), positive and effective parent–child interaction skills (Parenting), and maintaining low hazard homes (Safety). The effectiveness of these training components was evaluated as the change in the parents' scores on roleplay situations for child health problems, hazards present in the home, and the frequency and quality of parent–child interactions during activities of daily living. Statistically significant improvements were seen in child health care, home safety, and parent–child interactions.

health safety bonding parenting skills abuse neglect child maltreatment parent–child interactions 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronit M. Gershater-Molko
    • 1
  • John R. Lutzker
    • 1
  • David Wesch
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family LifeUniversity of KansasLawrenceKansas
  2. 2.Behavioral Ecology ConsultingFarmingtonNew Mexico

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