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Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 327–358 | Cite as

Teachers' Emotions and Teaching: A Review of the Literature and Directions for Future Research

  • Rosemary E. SuttonEmail author
  • Karl F. Wheatley
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to review the limited literature on the emotional aspects of teachers' lives. First, a multicomponential perspective on emotions is described, then the existing literature on teachers' positive and negative emotions is reviewed and critiqued. Next is a summary of the literature suggesting that teachers' emotions influence teachers' and students' cognitions, motivation, and behaviors. Four areas for future research are proposed: management and discipline, adoption and use of teaching strategies, learning to teach, and teachers' motivation. An overview of research methods used in a multicomponential perspective on emotions is provided. This review draws on a variety of research literatures: educational psychology, social and personality psychology, educational sociology, and research on teachers and teaching.

emotions teachers motivation learning to teach 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and FoundationsCleveland State UniversityCleveland
  2. 2.Department of Teacher EducationCleveland State UniversityCleveland

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