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Journal of Immigrant Health

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 165–172 | Cite as

Identifying Best Practices of Community Participation in Providing Services to Refugee Survivors of Torture: A Case Description

  • Anila Ramaliu
  • Wilfreda E. Thurston
Article

Abstract

There is an increased interest in best practices in the design and implementation of specialized programs for refugee survivors of torture. The processes taking place in the development of such a program also warrant assessment. In particular, this paper addresses the importance of community participation. Using the Host Support Program for Survivors of Torture as a case study, we identify the community participation practices that emerged during stages of program development and describe how these practices have made possible a collaborative service delivery model and facilitated community capacity building that addresses the complex needs of refugee survivors of torture. The process of community collaboration is discussed as central to the process of effective community participation and organizing. The illustrated benefits of community participation position this model as a best practice.

survivors of torture refugee participation best practices 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  2. 2.Calgary Host Support Program for Survivors of TortureCalgaryCanada

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