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Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 277–321 | Cite as

Land-Use Conflict and the Rate of the Transition to Agricultural Economy: A Comparative Study of Southern Scandinavia and Central-Western Korea

  • Jangsuk Kim
Article

Abstract

Although the forager–farmer interaction model successfully explains the gradual transmission of farming technology to foraging groups, it fails to explain rapid, abrupt transition to agricultural economies. This paper suggests that interaction between farmers and foragers often includes conflict and competition over land and that this conflict between different land-use strategies may lead to a rapid, discontinuous transition of subsistence economy. Comparing southern Scandinavian and central-western Korean cases, this paper suggests that the rapid transition to an agricultural economy in central-western Korea was a consequence of the appearance of territoriality of farmers in mobile, land-sharing context, resulting in a decrease in number of resource patches available to foragers.

transition to agriculture land-use strategy southern Scandinavia central-western Korea 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jangsuk Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyChonnam National UniversityGwangjuKorea

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