Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 573–578 | Cite as

Brief Report: Treatment of Echolalia in a Girl with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome: Functional Assessment of Minimizing Chances to Provoke Echolalia

  • Bo In Chung

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bo In Chung
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation, College of Health ScienceYonsei UniversityWonju, Kangwon-doKorea

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