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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 287–302 | Cite as

The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: Supplementary Norms for Individuals with Autism

  • Alice S. Carter
  • Fred R. Volkmar
  • Sara S. Sparrow
  • Jing-Jen Wang
  • Catherine Lord
  • Geraldine Dawson
  • Eric Fombonne
  • Katherine Loveland
  • Gary Mesibov
  • Eric Schopler
Article

Abstract

Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Special Population norms are presented for four groups of individuals with autism: (a) mute children under 10 years of age; (b) children with at least some verbal skills under 10 years of age; (c) mute individuals who are 10 years of age or older; and (d) individuals with at least some verbal skills who are 10 years of age or older. The sample included 684 autistic individuals ascertained from cases referred for the DSM-IV autism/PDD field trial collaborative study and five university sites with expertise in autism. Young children had higher standard scores than older individuals across all Vineland domains. In the Communication domain, younger verbal children were least impaired, older mute individuals most impaired, and younger mute and older verbal individuals in the midrange. Verbal individuals achieved higher scores in Daily Living Skills than mute individuals. The expected profile of a relative weakness in Socialization and relative strength in Daily Living Skills was obtained with age-equivalent but not standard scores. Results highlight the importance of employing Vineland special population norms as well as national norms when evaluating individuals with autism.

Vineland Behavior Scales special population norms autism 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alice S. Carter
    • 1
  • Fred R. Volkmar
    • 2
  • Sara S. Sparrow
    • 2
  • Jing-Jen Wang
    • 3
  • Catherine Lord
    • 4
  • Geraldine Dawson
    • 5
  • Eric Fombonne
    • 6
    • 10
  • Katherine Loveland
    • 7
  • Gary Mesibov
    • 8
  • Eric Schopler
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Yale School of Medicine Child Study CenterNew Haven
  2. 2.Yale School of Medicine Child Study Center and Yale University Department of PsychologyNew Haven
  3. 3.American Guidance ServiceMinneapolis
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of ChicagoChicago
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyUniversity of SeattleSeattle
  6. 6.Medical Research CouncilUniversity of LondonLondonUnited Kingdom
  7. 7.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceUniversity of TexasHouston
  8. 8.Division TEACCHUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel Hill
  9. 9.Division TEACCHUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel Hill
  10. 10.INSERMCentre de Alfred BinetParisFrance

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