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Chromosome Research

, Volume 11, Issue 7, pp 695–703 | Cite as

Evolution of ribosomal DNA unit on the X chromosome independent of autosomal units in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha

  • Masaki Fujisawa
  • Shigeki Nakayama
  • Tomohisa Nishio
  • Mariko Fujishita
  • Kiwako Hayashi
  • Kimitsune Ishizaki
  • Masataka Kajikawa
  • Katsuyuki T. Yamato
  • Hideya Fukuzawa
  • Kanji Ohyama
Article

Abstract

In the haploid dioecious liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, the X chromosome, but not the Y, carries a cluster of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs). Here we show that sequences of 5S, 17S, 5.8S and 26S rDNAs are highly conserved (>99% identity) between the X chromosomal and autosomal rDNA repeat units, but the intergenic spacer sequences differ considerably. The most prominent difference is the presence of a 615-bp DNA fragment in the intergenic spacer, X615, which has accumulated predominantly in the rDNA cluster of the X chromosome. These observations suggest that the rDNA repeat unit on the X chromosome evolved independently of that on autosomes, incorporating sex chromosome-specific sequences.

fluorescence in-situ hybridization intergenic spacer liverwort Marchantia ribosomal DNA X chromosome 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaki Fujisawa
    • 1
  • Shigeki Nakayama
    • 2
  • Tomohisa Nishio
    • 1
  • Mariko Fujishita
    • 3
  • Kiwako Hayashi
    • 1
  • Kimitsune Ishizaki
    • 1
  • Masataka Kajikawa
    • 1
  • Katsuyuki T. Yamato
    • 1
  • Hideya Fukuzawa
    • 1
  • Kanji Ohyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, Division of Integrated Life Science, Graduate School of BiostudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Genetic Diversity DepartmentNational Institute of Agrobiological SciencesKannondai, TsukubaJapan
  3. 3.Bio-oriented Technology Research Advancement InstitutionTokyoJapan

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