Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 113–125 | Cite as

Sexual Behavior in Adults with Autism

  • Mary E. Van Bourgondien
  • Nancy C. Reichle
  • Ann Palmer
Article

Abstract

A survey of the sexual behavior of 89 adults with autism living in group homes in North Carolina found that the majority of individuals were engaging in some form of sexual behavior. Masturbation was the most common sexual behavior. However, person-oriented sexual behaviors with obvious signs of arousal were also present in one third of the sample. The relationship between sexual behavior and demographic variables and other types of behaviors is explored. Information regarding group home sexuality policies and procedures are described.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary E. Van Bourgondien
    • 1
  • Nancy C. Reichle
    • 1
  • Ann Palmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill

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