Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 76, Issue 1, pp 83–86

Microprogagation of endangered Chinese aloe

  • Zhihua Liao
  • Min Chen
  • Feng Tan
  • Xiaofen Sun
  • Kexuan Tang
Article

Abstract

A rapid micropropagation protocol was established for Aloe vera L. var. chinensis (Haw.) Berger, Chinese Aloe. The effects of three factors, namely BA, NAA and sucrose, on bud initiation were evaluated by L9 (34) orthogonal design. The variance analysis of the experimental results showed that the actions of the three factors were all considerable. Among the three factors, sucrose was the most important for bud initiation followed by BA, and NAA had the weakest effect. The best medium for bud initiation was semi-solid MS supplemented with 2.0 mg l−1 BA, 0.3 mg l−1 NAA, 30 g l−1 sucrose and 0.6 g l−1 PVP (pH 5.8), on which Chinese aloe could multiply 15 times in 4 weeks. Some shoots rooted spontaneously on 1/2 strength MS medium, but the rooting percentage was improved in the presence of 0.2 mg l−1 NAA. Rooted plantlets were acclimatized to greenhouse conditions. The young plantlets from tissue culture were transplanted successfully. In vitro propagation can be a useful tool in the conservation of this endangered medicinal species.

Aloe vera L. var. chinensis (Haw.) Berger BA NAA orthogonal design rapid propagation sucrose superior medium 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhihua Liao
    • 1
  • Min Chen
    • 2
  • Feng Tan
    • 3
  • Xiaofen Sun
    • 1
  • Kexuan Tang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan-SJTU-Nottingham Plant Biotechnology R&D CenterFudan UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  2. 2.School of PharmacyFudan UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  3. 3.School of Life SciencesSouthwest Normal UniversityChongqingP.R. China

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