Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 677–696 | Cite as

Nonverbal Communication in Two- and Three-Year-Old Children with Autism

  • Wendy L. Stone
  • Opal Y. Ousley
  • Paul J. Yoder
  • Kerry L. Hogan
  • Susan L. Hepburn
Article

Abstract

The forms, functions, and complexity of nonverbal communication used by very young children with autism were investigated. Fourteen children with autism were matched to 14 children with developmental delays and/or language impairments on the basis of CA, MA, and expressive vocabulary. Subjects participated in a structured communication assessment consisting of 16 situations designed to elicit requesting or commenting behavior. Children with autism requested more often and commented less often than controls. Autistic children were less likely to point, show objects, or use eye gaze to communicate, but were more likely to directly manipulate the examiner's hand. The autistic group also used less complex combinations of behaviors to communicate. Implications for early identification and intervention are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy L. Stone
    • 1
  • Opal Y. Ousley
    • 2
  • Paul J. Yoder
    • 2
  • Kerry L. Hogan
    • 2
  • Susan L. Hepburn
    • 2
  1. 1.Vanderbilt University School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Peabody College of Vanderbilt UniversityUSA

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