Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 283–293

Sensory-Perceptual Abnormalities in Autism: A Case For More Research?

  • Meena O'Neill
  • Robert S. P. Jones
Article

Abstract

Sensory-perceptual abnormalities in people with autism are discussed from two perspectives: published firsthand accounts and existing psychological research evidence. A range of abnormalities, including hyper- and hyposensitivity, sensory distortion and overload, and multichannel receptivity and processing difficulties, are described in firsthand accounts and frequently portrayed as central to the autistic experience. A number of dangers are inherent in uncritically accepting these accounts at face value and in any wider generalization to the autistic population as a whole. Evidence from clinical studies suggests that unusual sensory responses are present in a majority of autistic children, that they are manifested very early in development, and that they may be linked with other aspects of autistic behavior. In addition, experimental studies using a range of indices have found evidence of unusual responses to sensory stimuli in autistic subjects. However the clinical and experimental research to date suffers from serious methodological limitations and more systematic investigation is warranted. Key issues for future psychological research in the area are identified.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meena O'Neill
    • 1
  • Robert S. P. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Gwynedd Community Health Trust and University of WalesBangor
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity College of North Wales, BangorGwyneddUnited Kingdom

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