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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 519–537 | Cite as

Does Teaching Theory of Mind Have an Effect on the Ability to Develop Conversation in Children with Autism?

  • Julie Hadwin
  • Simon Baron-Cohen
  • Patricia Howlin
  • Katie Hill
Article

Abstract

The present research examined whether teaching children with autism to pass tasks that assess mental state understanding had any positive effects on communication. Two aspects of communication previously shown to be deficient in children with autism were considered. These are conversational ability, in particular the ability to expand on conversation, and the use of mental state terms in speech. Results showed that no discernible improvement was seen on either measure of communication following mental state teaching. Discussion centers on real versus superficial changes in understanding mental states as a result of teaching.

Keywords

Mental State State Teaching State Term Teaching Theory Discussion Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Hadwin
    • 1
  • Simon Baron-Cohen
    • 2
  • Patricia Howlin
    • 3
  • Katie Hill
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Kent at CanterburyCanterbury
  2. 2.University of CambridgeUK
  3. 3.St. George's Medical SchoolUniversity of LondonUK

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