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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 697–714 | Cite as

Instructional Considerations for Young Children with Autism: The Rationale for Visually Cued Instruction

  • Kathleen A. Quill
Article

Abstract

Instructional considerations for children with autism who continue to struggle with current treatment models are discussed. Specifically, the use of instructional strategies for children who may be characterized as visual learners are addressed. The discussion begins with a review of research that illuminates the learning style differences associated with autism. Next, the instructional strategies of both behavioral and incidental teaching methods are examined in light of the research. Finally, using a case study as the backdrop, the discussion concludes with a description of how visually cued instruction can be applied in various contexts.

Keywords

Young Child Current Treatment Treatment Model Teaching Method Instructional Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen A. Quill
    • 1
  1. 1.The Autism InstituteEssex

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