Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 7–13

Inhibition and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

  • Herbert C. Quay
Article

Abstract

This paper updates the author's earlier hypothesis that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) reflects underactivity in Gray's Behavioral Inhibition System. Five areas of research are reviewed: (1) studies using the stop-signal task, (2) studies of errors of commission, (3) a study of inhibition indexed by eye movements, (4) a neuroimaging study of the corpus callosum, and (5) a study on the prediction of response to methylphenidate. Data from the many different dependent variables in these studies are interpreted as supporting disinhibition as a core deficit in ADHD.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder disinhibition the Behavioral Inhibition System stop-signal task methylphenidate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert C. Quay
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MiamiCoral Gables

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