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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 399–402 | Cite as

Editorial: The Politics and Science of “Reparative Therapy”

  • Kenneth J. Zucker
Editorial Introduction

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth J. Zucker

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