Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 25, Issue 18, pp 1531–1535

A microbial fuel cell capable of converting glucose to electricity at high rate and efficiency

  • Korneel Rabaey
  • Geert Lissens
  • Steven D. Siciliano
  • Willy Verstraete
Article

Abstract

A microbial fuel cell containing a mixed bacterial culture utilizing glucose as carbon source was enriched to investigate power output in relation to glucose dosage. Electron recovery in terms of electricity up to 89% occurred for glucose feeding rates in the range 0.5–3 g l−1 d−1, at powers up to 3.6 W m−2 of electrode surface, a five fold higher power output than reported thus far. This research indicates that microbial electricity generation offers perspectives for optimization.

biofuel cell glucose loading rate mixed bacterial community 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Korneel Rabaey
    • 1
  • Geert Lissens
    • 1
  • Steven D. Siciliano
    • 1
  • Willy Verstraete
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET)Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium

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