Child Psychiatry and Human Development

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 3–17 | Cite as

Factor Analysis of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-R

  • Michael L. Cuccaro
  • Yujan Shao
  • Janet Grubber
  • Michael Slifer
  • Chantelle M. Wolpert
  • Shannon L. Donnelly
  • Ruth K. Abramson
  • Sarah A. Ravan
  • Harry H. Wright
  • G. Robert DeLong
  • Margaret A. Pericak-Vance

Abstract

The current study examined the factor structure of restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRB) in children with autism. Factor extraction procedures of 12 items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) were applied in N = 207 individuals with autism. Two interpretable factors were identified: Factor 1—repetitive sensory motor actions and Factor 2—resistance to change. There was a significant negative correlation between an index of level of adaptive functioning and Factor 1. Intraclass correlations were not significant for either factor in a subset of families with two or more siblings with autism (multiplex). No differences in scores were apparent for either factor when multiplex families and families containing only one affected individual with autism (singleton) were compared. RRB in autism are represented by two distinct factors which may reflect two separate groups within autism. Defining subgroups within autism will allow for reduction of clinical heterogeneity and enhance our ability to dissect the genetic etiology of this complex disorder.

autism repetitive behaviors factor analysis 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Cuccaro
    • 1
  • Yujan Shao
    • 2
  • Janet Grubber
    • 2
  • Michael Slifer
    • 2
  • Chantelle M. Wolpert
    • 2
  • Shannon L. Donnelly
    • 2
  • Ruth K. Abramson
    • 3
  • Sarah A. Ravan
    • 3
  • Harry H. Wright
    • 3
  • G. Robert DeLong
    • 2
  • Margaret A. Pericak-Vance
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Human GeneticsDuke University Medical CenterDurham
  2. 2.Duke University Medical CenterUSA
  3. 3.University of South CarolinaUSA

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