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Journal of Applied Phycology

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 305–310 | Cite as

Antioxidant activities of sulfated polysaccharide fractions from Porphyra haitanesis

  • Quanbin Zhang
  • Pengzhan Yu
  • Zhien Li
  • Hong Zhang
  • Zuhong Xu
  • Pengcheng Li
Article

Abstract

Three sulfated polysaccharide fractions (F1, F2, and F3) were isolated from Porphyra haitanesis, an important economic alga in China, through anion-exchange column chromatography and their in vitro antioxidant activities were investigated in this study. Galactose was the main sugar unit of the three fractions. The analytical results indicated that polysaccharide fractions from P. haitanesis had similar chemical components to porphyran from other species, but differed in their high sulfate content. The sulfate content of F1, F2 and F3 was 17.4%, 20.5% and 33.5% respectively. All three polysaccharide fractions showed antioxidant activities. They had strong scavenging effect on superoxide radical, and much weaker effect on hydroxyl free radical. Lipid peroxide in rat liver microsome was significantly inhibited, and H2O2 induced hemolysis of rat erythrocyte was partly inhibited by F1, F2 and F3. Among them, F3 showed strongest scavenging effect on superoxide radical; F2 had strongest effect on hydroxyl radical and lipid peroxide.

Antioxidant China Lipid peroxide Porphyra haitanesis Sulfated polysaccharide 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Quanbin Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pengzhan Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhien Li
    • 1
  • Hong Zhang
    • 1
  • Zuhong Xu
    • 1
  • Pengcheng Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoP.R.China
  2. 2.The Graduate SchoolChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP.R.China

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