Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 427–433

Validation of a Brief Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits: Comparison of the Social Responsiveness Scale with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised

  • John N. Constantino
  • Sandra A. Davis
  • Richard D. Todd
  • Matthew K. Schindler
  • Maggie M. Gross
  • Susan L. Brophy
  • Lisa M. Metzger
  • Christiana S. Shoushtari
  • Reagan Splinter
  • Wendy Reich
Article

Abstract

Studies of the broader autism phenotype, and of subtle changes in autism symptoms over time, have been compromised by a lack of established quantitative assessment tools. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS—formerly known as the Social Reciprocity Scale) is a new instrument that can be completed by parents and/or teachers in 15–20 minutes. We compared the SRS with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) in 61 child psychiatric patients. Correlations between SRS scores and ADI-R algorithm scores for DSM-IV criterion sets were on the order of 0.7. SRS scores were unrelated to I.Q. and exhibited inter-rater reliability on the order of 0.8. The SRS is a valid quantitative measure of autistic traits, feasible for use in clinical settings and for large-scale research studies of autism spectrum conditions.

Social responsiveness scale ADI-R psychometrics PDD 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • John N. Constantino
    • 1
  • Sandra A. Davis
    • 1
  • Richard D. Todd
    • 1
  • Matthew K. Schindler
    • 1
  • Maggie M. Gross
    • 1
  • Susan L. Brophy
    • 1
  • Lisa M. Metzger
    • 1
  • Christiana S. Shoushtari
    • 1
  • Reagan Splinter
    • 1
  • Wendy Reich
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and PediatricsWashington University School of MedicineSaint Louis

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