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Research in Higher Education

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 77–97 | Cite as

Minority and Nonminority Adjustment to College: Differences or Similarities?

  • Mardy T. Eimers
  • Gary R. Pike
Article

Abstract

Using a model of retention, this study focused on minority and nonminority students' adjustment to college. Data were collected via mailed questionnaire from 799 freshmen at a residential, public research university in the Midwest. Path analysis was used to test the model. Results indicated that perceived quality had significant effects on intent to persist for minorities but not for nonminorities, and academic achievement had significant effects on intent to persist for nonminorities but not for minorities. Similarities between the two groups, however, clearly overshadowed differences. For instance, perceived racial discrimination exerted equivalent effects (although weak) on intent to persist for minorities and nonminorities.

Keywords

Academic Achievement Education Research Path Analysis Public Research Racial Discrimination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mardy T. Eimers
    • 1
  • Gary R. Pike
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Missouri SystemColumbia
  2. 2.University of Missouri–ColumbiaColumbia

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