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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 174–176 | Cite as

Determination of Aroma Compounds in Blackberry by GC/MS Analysis

  • N. Turemis
  • E. Kafkas
  • S. Kafkas
  • M. Kurkcuoglu
  • K. H. C. Baser
Article

Abstract

The aromatic composition of five blackberry cultivars (Bursa 2, Navaho, Nessy, Chester Thornless, and Jumbo) was studied. The Im-SPME (Immersion Solid Phase Micro Extraction) extraction technique was applied and the samples were analyzed by GC/MS. Furfural and its derivatives were found to be the major aromatic compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was the most abundant compound in all the blackberry varieties.

blackberry aroma Im-SPME furfural GC/MS 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Turemis
    • 1
  • E. Kafkas
    • 1
  • S. Kafkas
    • 1
  • M. Kurkcuoglu
    • 2
  • K. H. C. Baser
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CukurovaAdanaTURKEY
  2. 2.Medicinal and Aromatic Plant and Drug Research Centre (TBAM)University of AnadoluEskisehirTURKEY

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