Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 447–456 | Cite as

Not Even a Day in the Life

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of California, Santa CruzSanta Cruz

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