Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 241–253 | Cite as

Neurofeedback Training for a Patient with Thalamic and Cortical Infarctions

  • Thomas S. Bearden
  • Jeffrey E. Cassisi
  • Mario Pineda

Abstract

One year after a left posterior and thalamic stroke, a 52-year-old male participant was treated with 14 weeks of theta reduction neurofeedback training. Imaging studies revealed left temporal, parietal, occipital, and bilateral thalamic infarctions along the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated severe verbal memory, naming, visual tracking, and fine motor deficits. Additionally, alexia without agraphia was present. A pretraining quantitative electroencephalograph (QEEG) found alpha attenuation, lack of alpha reactivity to eye opening, and excessive theta activity from the left posterior head region. Neurofeedback training to inhibit 4–8 Hz theta activity was conducted for 42 sessions from left hemisphere sites. Over the course of the training, significant reductions in theta amplitude occurred from the training sites as assessed from the postsession baseline periods. Posttraining, a relative normalization of the QEEG was observed from the left posterior head region.

neurofeedback neurotherapy QEEG stroke CVA 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Ayers, M. E. (1999). Assessing and treating open head trauma, coma, and stroke using real-time digital EEG neurofeedback. In J. Evans & A. Abarbanel (Eds.), Introduction to quantitative EEG and neurofeedback (pp. 203-222). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  2. Cantor, D. S. (1999). An overview of quantitative EEG and its applications to neurofeedback. In J. Evans & A. Abarbanel (Eds.), Introduction to quantitative EEG and neurofeedback (pp. 3-27). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  3. Cummings, L., Dane, A., Rhodes, J., Lynch, P., & Hughes, A. M. (2000). Diurnal variation in the quantitative EEG in healthy adult volunteers. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 50, 21-26.Google Scholar
  4. Damasio, A. R., & Damasio, H. (1983). The anatomic basis of pure alexia. Neurology, 33, 1573-1583.Google Scholar
  5. Derogatis, L. R. (1993). Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI): Administration, scoring, and procedures manual (3rd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: National Computer Systems, Inc.Google Scholar
  6. Hoffman, D., Stockdale, S., Hicks, L., & Schwaninger, J. (1995). Diagnosis and treatment of head injury. Journal of Neurotherapy, 1(1), 14-21.Google Scholar
  7. Hughes, J. R., & John, E. R. (1999). Conventional and quantitative electroencephalography in psychiatry. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 11, 190-208.Google Scholar
  8. Jorgensen, H., Nakayama, H., Raaschou, H., Vive-Larsen, J., Stoier, M., & Olsen, T. (1995). Outcome and time course of recovery in stroke. Part II: Time course of recovery, the Copenhagen stroke study. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 76, 406-412.Google Scholar
  9. Lezak, M. D. (1983). Neuropsychological assessment (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Niedermeyer, E. (1998). Cerebrovascular disorders and EEG. In E. Niedermeyer & F. L. Da Silva (Eds.), Electroencephalography (4th ed., pp. 215-234). New York: Lippincott Williams & Williams.Google Scholar
  11. Othmer, S., Othmer, S. F., & Kaiser, D. A. (1999). EEG biofeedback: An emerging model for its global efficacy. In J. Evans & A. Abarbanel (Eds.), Introduction to quantitative EEG and neurofeedback (pp. 243-310). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  12. Putman, J. A. (2001). EEG biofeedback on a female patient stroke patient with depression: a case study. Journal of Neurotherapy, 5(3), 27-38.Google Scholar
  13. Reitan, R., & Wolfson, D. (1993). The Halstead-Reitan neuropsychological test battery (2nd ed.). Tucscon, AZ: Neuropsychology Press.Google Scholar
  14. Rozelle, G., & Budzynski, T. (1995). Neurotherapy for stroke rehabilitation: A single case study. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation, 20(3), 211-228.Google Scholar
  15. Schuell, H. (1965). Administrative manual for the Minnesota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  16. Sharbrough, F. W. (1998). Nonspecific abnormal EEG patterns. In E. Niedermeyer & F. H. Lopes Da Silva (Eds.), Electroencephalography (4th ed., pp. 215-234). New York: Lippincott Williams & Williams.Google Scholar
  17. Thornton, K. (2000). Improvement/rehabilitation of memory functioning with neurotherapy/QEEG biofeedback. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 15(6), 1285-1296.Google Scholar
  18. Wechsler, D. (1981). WAIS-R manual. New York: The Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
  19. Wechsler, D. (1987). Wechsler Memory Scale—Revised manual. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas S. Bearden
    • 1
  • Jeffrey E. Cassisi
    • 3
  • Mario Pineda
    • 4
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyJackson State UniversityJackson
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyJackson State UniversityJackson
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyJackson State UniversityJackson
  4. 4.Neurofeedback InstituteJackson

Personalised recommendations