Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 13–23

The Timing of Home Leaving: A Comparison of Early, On-Time, and Late Home Leavers

  • Shengming Tang
Article

Abstract

This study employs the National Survey of Families and Households of 1988 to study the predictors of age at home leaving for three groups of home leavers: early, on time, and late. Predictors examined include family structure, family formation, and personal characteristics. Discriminant analysis suggests that predictors vary by age of home leaving, and that the differences between early and other types of home leavers are most salient. The impact of family structure is the strongest for early home leaving, but much less for on-time and late home leaving.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shengming Tang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyWestern Illinois UniversityMacomb

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