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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 63–76 | Cite as

Advice About Life Plans and Personal Problems in Late Adolescent Sibling Relationships

  • Corinna Jenkins Tucker
  • Bonnie L. Barber
  • Jacquelynne S. Eccles
Article

Abstract

This study examined older adolescents' perceptions of the following sibling relationship characteristics: advice about life plans and personal problems, satisfaction with support, and sibling influence on interests and goals. Little is known about late adolescent sibling relationships and siblings' role in the identity formation process. Differences between first- and secondborns, males and females, and opposite- and same-gender sibling pairs were explored. Participants were 223 adolescents (M = 17.5 years old) who filled out a survey in their senior year of high school. All adolescents were from always-married families and had one sibling between the ages of 13 and 23. Analyses revealed that both secondborns and females reported receiving more advice, being more satisfied with sibling support, and being influenced more by their sibling than firstborns and males, respectively. In addition, those in female–female sibling pairs received more advice from their siblings than those in male–male and mixed gender pairs. Findings revealed that adolescents do sometimes rely on their siblings as a source of advice about life plans and personal problems.

Keywords

High School Formation Process Identity Formation Late Adolescent Sibling Pair 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corinna Jenkins Tucker
    • 1
  • Bonnie L. Barber
    • 2
  • Jacquelynne S. Eccles
    • 3
  1. 1.Human Development and Family Studies DepartmentThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park
  2. 2.Family Studies DepartmentUniversity of ArizonaTucson
  3. 3.Psychology DepartmentThe University of MichiganAnn Arbor

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