Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 80, Issue 1, pp 79–85 | Cite as

Expression of Estrogen Receptor-β in Normal Mammary and Tumor Tissues: is it Protective in Breast Carcinogenesis?

  • Byeong-Woo Park
  • Ki-Suk Kim
  • Min-Kyu Heo
  • Seung-Sang Ko
  • Kyong Sik Lee
  • Soon Won Hong
  • Woo-Ick Yang
  • Joo-Hang Kim
  • Gwi Eon Kim
Article

Abstract

Using messenger RNA (mRNA) in situ hybridization, we investigated estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) mRNA levels in normal mammary, benign breast tumor (BBT), breast cancer (BC), and metastatic lymph node tissues to verify the role of ERβ in BC development and progression. ERβ expression was significantly decreased in BC and metastatic lymph node tissues compared with normal mammary and BBT tissues (p < 0.01). The intensity and extent of ERβ mRNA signals were also significantly lower in BC and metastatic lymph node tissues than in the normal mammary and BBT tissues (p < 0.01). An inverse relationship was found between ERβ mRNA level and both histologic grade (p = 0.091) and progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.052) with marginal significance, but no significant association was noted between ERβ expression in cancer tissues and the other clinico-pathologic data. The 3-year distant relapse-free survival probability was found to be independent of ERβ expression. Collectively, ERβ mRNA decreases in the process of BC development, but seems to be associated with poor differentiation.

breast cancer carcinogenesis estrogen receptor-β in situ hybridization prognosis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Byeong-Woo Park
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ki-Suk Kim
  • Min-Kyu Heo
  • Seung-Sang Ko
    • 1
  • Kyong Sik Lee
    • 1
  • Soon Won Hong
    • 2
  • Woo-Ick Yang
    • 2
  • Joo-Hang Kim
    • 3
  • Gwi Eon Kim
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.Brain Korea 21 ProjectYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea

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