Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 247–259 | Cite as

Rumination Reconsidered: A Psychometric Analysis

  • Wendy Treynor
  • Richard Gonzalez
  • Susan Nolen-Hoeksema

Abstract

In an attempt to eliminate similar item content as an alternative explanation for the relation between depression and rumination, a secondary analysis was conducted using the data from S. Nolen-Hoeksema, J. Larson, and C. Grayson (1999). After constructing a measure of rumination unconfounded with depression content, support for a two factor model of rumination was found. These analyses indicate that the 2 components, reflective pondering and brooding, differentially relate to depression in terms of predictive ability and gender difference mediation. The results presented here support the general premise of Nolen-Hoeksema's Response Styles Theory (S. Nolen-Hoeksema 1987) that rumination can contribute to more depressive symptoms and to the gender difference in depression, but suggest important refinements of the theory. Such refinements include the need to differentiate between the reflective pondering component of rumination and the brooding component in rumination research.

depression rumination psychometrics 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Treynor
    • 1
  • Richard Gonzalez
    • 1
  • Susan Nolen-Hoeksema
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn Arbor

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