Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 12, Issue 8, pp 1641–1648 | Cite as

Use of oligonucleotide fingerprinting and faecal DNA in identifying the distribution of the Chinese tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis Hilzheimer)

  • Qiu-Hong Wan
  • Sheng-Guo Fang
  • Guo-Fu Chen
  • Zhang-Ming Wang
  • Ping Ding
  • Mu-Yuan Zhu
  • Kong-Shou Chen
  • Jiu-Hua Yu
  • Yue-Ping Zhao
Article

Abstract

Chinese tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis Hilzheimer) was once distributed in the Zhejiang Province, China, but there have not been any tiger sightings in this province since 1985. Fortunately, within the boundaries of the Fengyangshan-baishanzu State Natural Reserve, gamekeepers have found ‘tiger footprints’ and ‘tiger faeces’ many times since 1998. However, these tracks may have been left by the leopard or clouded leopard, which leave similar tracks. The presence of the Chinese tiger in Zhejiang Province was demonstrated using DNA fingerprinting and faecal DNA. The study not only revealed a new habitat for Chinese tigers, Zhejiang Province, but also provided an effective scatology method to identify the distribution of tigers and other wild felines.

Chinese tiger DNA fingerprinting Faecal DNA Species identification Species-specific probe 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiu-Hong Wan
  • Sheng-Guo Fang
  • Guo-Fu Chen
  • Zhang-Ming Wang
  • Ping Ding
  • Mu-Yuan Zhu
  • Kong-Shou Chen
  • Jiu-Hua Yu
  • Yue-Ping Zhao

There are no affiliations available

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