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Journal of Psychotherapy Integration

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 97–113 | Cite as

Theoretical Orientations of New Zealand Psychologists: An International Comparison

  • Nikolaos Kazantzis
  • Frank P. Deane
Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Registered practicing psychologists in New Zealand (n = 221) were surveyed concerning their predominant theoretical orientation. Results were compared with findings obtained among Australian psychologists by Byrne and Reinhart (1990), British psychologists by Garrett and Davis (1995), and North American psychologists by Norcross, Karg, and Prochaska (1997a). The results showed that while New Zealand psychologists use cognitive approaches more often than both British and North American psychologists, they use behavioral and psychodynamic approaches less often. Overall, it was found that the eclectic approach is the most popular theoretical orientation obtained in surveys of Australian, New Zealand, and North American psychologists, in that no group subscribed exclusively to a single theoretical orientation.

theoretical orientation Australia Britain North American New Zealand 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikolaos Kazantzis
    • 1
  • Frank P. Deane
    • 2
  1. 1.School of PsychologyMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia

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