Water, Air and Soil Pollution: Focus

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 67–79

The Relation Between Sandstorms and Strong Winds in Xinjiang, China

  • Xu Wang
  • Yu Ma
  • Hongwu Chen
  • Gang Wen
  • Shoujun Chen
  • Zuyu Tao
  • Yong-Seung Chung
Article

Abstract

With observational data spanning 1961–1999 from 90 meteorological stations in Xinjiang, China, the spatial and temporal characteristics of sandstorms and strong winds, and the contribution of strong winds to the occurrence of sandstormsare analyzed. Moreover, the dominant wind direction and minimumwind speeds during sandstorm periods are discussed. The research shows that although possessing similar climatic trends, sandstorms and strong winds in Xinjiang have opposite geographical distributions, i.e. places with more sandstorms show fewer strong winds. The contribution of strongwinds to sandstorms in northern Xinjiang is larger than that insouthern Xinjiang. The dominant wind directions clearly indicatethe paths of the weather systems that introduced the sandstorms.The minimum wind speeds in the sandstorms were over 10 ms-1in northern and eastern Xinjiang and in the Turpan and Yanqi Basins of southern Xinjiang. In Tarim Basin of southern Xinjiang,however, the minimum wind speed was about 6–8 ms-1, and even 6 ms-1 at its southern edge.

dominant wind direction minimum wind speed sandstorm strong wind Xinjiang 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xu Wang
    • 1
  • Yu Ma
    • 1
  • Hongwu Chen
    • 1
  • Gang Wen
    • 2
  • Shoujun Chen
    • 3
  • Zuyu Tao
    • 3
  • Yong-Seung Chung
    • 4
  1. 1.Xinjiang Center of Environmental MeteorologyUrumqi, XinjiangChina (author for correspondence
  2. 2.START Regional Center for Temperate East Asia, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.China-Korea Center for Atmospheric Research, Department of GeophysicsPeking UniversityBeijingChina
  4. 4.Korea-China Center for Atmospheric ResearchChongwonKorea

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