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Journal of Psycholinguistic Research

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 203–233 | Cite as

The Pros and Cons of Masked Priming

  • Kenneth I. Forster
Article

Abstract

Masked priming paradigms offer the promise of tapping automatic, strategy-free lexical processing, as evidenced by the lack of expectancy disconfirmation effects, and proportionality effects in semantic priming experiments. But several recent findings suggest the effects may be prelexical. These findings concern nonword priming effects in lexical decision and naming, the effects of mixed-case presentation on nonword priming, and the dependence of priming on the nature of the distractors in lexical decision, suggesting possible strategy effects. The theory underlying each of these effects is discussed, and alternative explanations are developed that do not preclude a lexical basis for masked priming effects.

Keywords

Cognitive Psychology Priming Effect Alternative Explanation Lexical Decision Semantic Priming 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth I. Forster
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucson

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