Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 379–384

Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale Scores as a Function of Age and Initial IQ in 210 Autistic Children

  • B. J. Freeman
  • M. Del'Homme
  • D. Guthrie
  • F. Zhang
Article
  • 1k Downloads

Abstract

Human growth modeling statistics were utilized to examine how Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) scores changed in individuals with autistic disorder as a function of both age and initial IQ. Results revealed that subjects improved with age in all domains. The rate of growth in Communication and Daily Living Skills was related to initial IQ while rate of growth in Social Skills was not. Results should provide hope for parents and further support for the importance of functional social-communication skills in the treatment of autism.

Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale autism age intelligence quotient 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. J. Freeman
    • 1
    • 1
  • M. Del'Homme
    • 1
  • D. Guthrie
    • 1
  • F. Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine and Neuropsychiatric InstituteLos Angeles

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