Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 265–283 | Cite as

Gambling Technologies: Prospects for Problem Gambling

  • Mark Griffiths
Article

Abstract

Technology his always played a role in the development of gambling practices and will continue to play a critical role in the development of increased gambling opportunities (e.g., internet gambling). Although technological advance his long been associated with improved gambling opportunities, there is little written in the literature explicitly pointing out this link and its implications for problem gamblers. This paper therefore reviews this situation and examines the technological implications of situational and structural characteristics paying particular attention to slot machine gambling as there has been more empirical work on this type of gambling than any other technological form. The impact of technology on the sociability of gambling is also examined followed by a more speculative evolution of internet gambling as an area of potential concern.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Griffiths
    • 1
  1. 1.Nottingham Trent UniversityUSA

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