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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 25, Issue 8, pp 631–636 | Cite as

Production of ajmalicine and ajmaline in hairy root cultures of Rauvolfia micrantha Hook f., a rare and endemic medicinal plant

  • C.G. Sudha
  • B. Obul Reddy
  • G.A. Ravishankar
  • S. Seeni
Article

Abstract

Hairy roots of Rauvolfia micrantha were induced from hypocotyl explants of 2–3 weeks old aseptic seedlings using Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC 15834. Hairy roots grown in half-strength Murashige & Skoog (MS) medium with 0.2 mg indole 3-butyric acid l−1 and 0.1 mg α-naphthaleneacetic acid l−1 produced more ajmaline (0.01 mg g−1 dry wt) and ajmalicine (0.006 mg g−1 dry wt) than roots grown in auxin-free medium. Ajmaline (0.003 mg g−1 dry wt) and ajmalicine (0.0007 mg g−1 dry wt) were also produced in normal root cultures. This is the first report of production of ajmaline and ajmalicine in hairy root cultures of Rauvolfia micrantha.

ajmalicine ajmaline hairy roots medicinal plant Rauvolfia micrantha 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.G. Sudha
    • 1
  • B. Obul Reddy
    • 2
  • G.A. Ravishankar
    • 2
  • S. Seeni
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Biotechnology DivisionTropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, ThiruvananthapuramKeralaIndia
  2. 2.Plant Cell Biotechnology DepartmentCentral Food Technological Research Institute, MysoreKarnatakaIndia

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