Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 187–192

The Yield of the Medical Evaluation of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

  • Thomas D. Challman
  • William J. Barbaresi
  • Slavica K. Katusic
  • Amy Weaver
Article

Abstract

Little information is available regarding the yield of the medical evaluation of children diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder–not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) compared to children diagnosed with autistic disorder. Medical records were reviewed for 182 patients less than 18 years of age with either PDD-NOS or autistic disorder evaluated between 1994 and 1998 at Mayo Clinic. A condition likely to be etiologically relevant was identified in 6/117 (5.1%) patients diagnosed with PDD-NOS and 2/65 (3.1%) patients diagnosed with autistic disorder. Genetic disorders, both chromosomal and single-gene, were the most commonly identified conditions. Seizure disorders, electroencephalogram abnormalities, and anomalies on brain imaging were common in both groups. The likelihood of uncovering an etiologically relevant condition in children diagnosed with either PDD-NOS or autistic disorder may be equivalent. The scope of the etiological search in an individual patient with an autistic spectrum disorder should not be limited by the specific diagnostic category.

Autism pervasive developmental disorder—not otherwise specified medical conditions chromosomal disorders 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas D. Challman
    • 1
  • William J. Barbaresi
    • 1
  • Slavica K. Katusic
    • 2
  • Amy Weaver
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Developmental and Behavioral PediatricsMayo ClinicRochester
  2. 2.Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of EpidemiologyMayo ClinicRochester
  3. 3.Division of BiostatisticsDepartment of Health Sciences ResearchRochester

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