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Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 271–294 | Cite as

Professors' Perspectives on Their Teaching: A New Construct and Developmental Model

  • Douglas L. Robertson
Article

Abstract

Building carefully on the college teaching and adult development literatures, this paper presents a model that describes the perspective of professors at various developmental positions with regard to their work as teachers. The model comprises five, interrelated positions: (a) three stable periods—Egocentrism (teacher-centeredness), Aliocentrism (learner-centeredness), and Systemocentrism (teacher/learner-centeredness); and (b) two transitional periods—one between each of the two potential movements from one stable period to the next. The model integrates the constructs of previous typologies, adds a significant new construct, and arranges the total array of perspectival constructs in a typical developmental sequence.

Keywords

Social Psychology College Teaching Developmental Model Cross Cultural Psychology Stable Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas L. Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.University Teaching and Learning CenterUniversity of NevadaLas Vegas

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