Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 271–294 | Cite as

Professors' Perspectives on Their Teaching: A New Construct and Developmental Model

  • Douglas L. Robertson

Abstract

Building carefully on the college teaching and adult development literatures, this paper presents a model that describes the perspective of professors at various developmental positions with regard to their work as teachers. The model comprises five, interrelated positions: (a) three stable periods—Egocentrism (teacher-centeredness), Aliocentrism (learner-centeredness), and Systemocentrism (teacher/learner-centeredness); and (b) two transitional periods—one between each of the two potential movements from one stable period to the next. The model integrates the constructs of previous typologies, adds a significant new construct, and arranges the total array of perspectival constructs in a typical developmental sequence.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas L. Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.University Teaching and Learning CenterUniversity of NevadaLas Vegas

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