Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 131–140

Effects of a Model Treatment Approach on Adults with Autism

  • Mary E. Van Bourgondien
  • Nancy C. Reichle
  • Eric Schopler
Note

Abstract

The study evaluated the effectiveness of a residential program, based on the TEACCH model, in improving the quality of the treatment program and the adaptation of individuals with autism with severe disabilities. The results indicated that participants in the Carolina Living and Learning Center experienced an increase in structure and individualized programming in the areas of communication, independence, socialization, developmental planning, and positive behavior management compared to participants in control settings. The experimental program was viewed as a more desirable place to live than the other settings, and the families were significantly more satisfied. Based on exploratory analyses, the use of the TEACCH methods over time were related to a decrease in behavior difficulties. There was no difference in the acquisition of skills.

Autism adults residential treatment outcome longitudinal 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary E. Van Bourgondien
    • 1
  • Nancy C. Reichle
    • 1
  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel Hill

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