Astrophysics

, Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 81–91 | Cite as

Fragmentation of Cosmic Objects in the Course of Their Evolution and the Possible Role of Hubble Expansion in this Process

  • G. A. Harutyunian
Article

Abstract

A series of phenomenological similarities between activity phenomena in the microscopic world and in the world of galaxies is examined. Proceeding from the high “metallicity” of quasars, it is shown that the relative amount of light elements, primarily hydrogen, increases during the evolution of the universe. Evidence supporting an analogous enrichment of the world of galaxies by dwarf galaxies is presented. A variant is proposed in which cD galaxies are the generators of the clusters of galaxies in which they are located, while all the galaxies of a given cluster are products of the activity of a central supergiant galaxy. An analogous mechanism is apparently responsible for the formation of systems of globular clusters. A physical connection between activity phenomena and cosmic expansion is sought.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Harutyunian
    • 1
  1. 1.V. A. Ambartsumyan Byurakan Astrophysical ObservatoryArmenia

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