Natural Hazards

, Volume 28, Issue 2–3, pp 211–228 | Cite as

Disaster Management and Community Planning, and Public Participation: How to Achieve Sustainable Hazard Mitigation

  • Laurie Pearce

Abstract

The paper offers first a brief historical overview of disaster management planning. Second, it reviews Australian and American research findings and show that they urge the field of disaster management to shift its focus from response and recovery to sustainable hazard mitigation. It is argued that in order for this shift to occur, it is necessary to integrate disaster management and community planning. Current practice seldom reflects such a synthesis, and this is one of the reasons why hazard awareness is absent from local decision-making processes. Third, it is asserted that if mitigative strategies are to be successfully implemented, then the disaster management process must incorporate public participation at the local decision-making level. The paper concludes with a case study of California's Portola Valley, which demonstrates that when public participation is integrated into disaster management planning and community planning, the result is sustainable hazard mitigation.

public participation community planning sustainable hazard mitigation disaster management planning 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aguirre, B.: 1994, Planning, Warning, Evacuation and Search and Rescue: A Review of the Social Science Research Literature, Recovery Center, Texas A&M University, Texas.Google Scholar
  2. Alesch, D. J. and Petak, W. J.: 1986, The Politics and Economics of Earthquake Hazard Mitigation, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO.Google Scholar
  3. Australia and New Zealand Standards Associations: 1995, The Australia/New Zealand Risk Management Standard, Australia and New Zealand Standard #4360, Sydney and Auckland.Google Scholar
  4. Beatley, T. and Berke, P. R.: 1993, Time to Shake Up Earthquake Planning, Hazard Reduction Recovery Center, Texas A&M University, College Station: Texas.Google Scholar
  5. Berke, P. R. and French, S. P.: 1994, The Influence of State Planning Mandates on Local Planning Quality, Recovery Center, Texas A&M University, Texas.Google Scholar
  6. Bolin, R.: 1993, Household and Community Recovery After Earthquakes, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO.Google Scholar
  7. Boothroyd, P. and Anderson, O. A.: 1983, The Difference Between Corporate and Social Planning, and the Implications for Indian Affairs, Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Regina, SK.Google Scholar
  8. Britton, N.: 1989, Decision-making in emergency organizations under conditions of crisis and uncertainty, In: Risk and Perception and Response in Australia: Proceedings of a Workshop at the Australian Counter Disaster Colleg, July 1989, The Center for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australia.Google Scholar
  9. Central United States Earthquake Consortium: 1993, Emergency Response and Recovery: Monograph 4, Central United States Earthquake Consortium, Memphis, Tennessee.Google Scholar
  10. Disaster Preparedness Resources Centre: 1998, The Mitigation Symposium: Towards a Canadian Mitigation Strategy, Comprehensive Symposium Proceeding, January 1998, The Disaster Preparedness Resources Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.Google Scholar
  11. Dorcey, A. H. J. and McDaniels, T.: 1999, Great expectation, mixed results: trends in citizen involvement in Canadian environmental governance, (http://www.interchg.ubc.ca/dorcey/trends), Cited with permission.Google Scholar
  12. Drabek, T. E.: 1991, The evolution of emergency management, In: Drabek, T. E. and Hoetmer, G. J. (eds), Emergency Management: Principles and Practice for Local Government, International City Management Association, Washington, DC, pp. 3–29.Google Scholar
  13. Drabek, T. E.: 1986, Human System Responses to Disaster: An Inventory of Sociological Findings, Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  14. Friedmann, J.: 1992, Empowerment: The Politics of Alternative Development, Blackwell, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  15. Godschalk, D. R., Kaiser, E.J., and Berke, P.R.: 1998, Hazard assessment: the factual basis for planning and mitigation, In: Burby, R. (ed.), Cooperating with Nature: Confronting Natural Hazards with Land-Use Planning for Sustainable Communities, Joseph Henry, Washington, DC, pp. 85–118.Google Scholar
  16. Hodge, G.: 1991, Planning Canadian Communities: An Introduction to the Principles, Practice, and Participants, Second Edition, Nelson, Toronto, ON.Google Scholar
  17. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies: 1995, World Disasters Report 1994, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  18. Keeney, R. L., Winterfeldt, D. V., and Eppel, T.: 1990, Eliciting public values for complex policy decisions Management Science 36(9), 1011–1030.Google Scholar
  19. Kreps, G. A.: 1991, Organizing for emergency management, In: Drabek T. E. and Hoetmer, G. J. (eds), Emergency Management: Principles and Practice for Local Government, International City Management Association, Washington, DC, pp. 30–54.Google Scholar
  20. Lash, J.: 1995, Integrating science, values, and democracy through comparative risk assessment, In: Finkel, A. M. and Golding, D. (eds), The Debate over Risk-Based National Environmental Priorities, Resources for the Future, Washington, DC, pp. 69–86.Google Scholar
  21. Laughy, L.: 1991, A Planner's Handbook for Emergency Preparednes, Centre for Human Settlements, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.Google Scholar
  22. Mader, G. G., Vlasix, T. C., and Gregory, P.A.: 1988, Geology and Planning: The Portola Valley Experience, Consolidated Publications, Portola Valley, CA.Google Scholar
  23. Mileti, D. S.: 1999, Disaster by Design, Joseph Henry Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  24. Myers, M. F.: 1997, Insights Emerging from the “Assessment of Research and Applications for Natural Hazards” in the United States, Disaster Preparedness Resources Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.Google Scholar
  25. National Research Council, Committee on Risk Characterization, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education: 1996, Understanding Risk: Informing Decisions in a Democratic Society, National Academy Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  26. Paterson, R. G.: 1998, The third sector: evolving partnerships in hazard mitigation, In: Burby, R. (ed.), Cooperating with Nature: Confronting Natural Hazards with Land-Use Planning for Sustainable Communities, Joseph Henry, Washington, DC, pp. 203–230.Google Scholar
  27. Pearce, L. D.: 2000, An Integrated Approach For Community Hazard, Impact, Risk and Vulnerability Analysis: HIRV, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.Google Scholar
  28. Petak, W. J.: 1985, Emergency management: a challenge for public administration, Public Administration Review 45(1), 3–7.Google Scholar
  29. Rubin, C.: 1991, Recovery from disaster, In: Drabek, T. E. and Hoetmer, G. J. (eds), Emergency Management: Principles and Practice for Local Government, International City Washington, DC, pp. 224–261.Google Scholar
  30. Thomas, J. C.: 1995, Public Participation in Public Decisions, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.Google Scholar
  31. Scanlon, T. J.: 1982, The roller coaster story of civil defence planning in Canada, Emergency Planning Digest, April–June, 7–14.Google Scholar
  32. Vroom, V. H. and Jago, A. G.: 1988, The New Leadership: Managing Participation in Organizations, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.Google Scholar
  33. Vroom, V. H. and Yetton, P.: 1973, Leadership and Decision Making, University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, PA.Google Scholar
  34. Ward, K. (ed.): 1989, Great Disasters, Readers Digest, Montreal, Quebec.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurie Pearce
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaNorth VancouverCanada

Personalised recommendations