Molecular Breeding

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 213–220 | Cite as

Transgenic cucumber fruits that produce elevated level of an anti-aging superoxide dismutase

  • Haeng-Soon Lee
  • Eun-Jeong Kwon
  • Suk-Yoon Kwon
  • Yu-Jeong Jeong
  • Eun-Mo Lee
  • Man-Hyun Jo
  • Hyun-Sook Kim
  • In-Sik Woo
  • Atsuhiko Shinmyo
  • Kazuya Yoshida
  • Sang-Soo Kwak
Article

Abstract

Superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays an important role in cellular defense against oxidative stress in aerobic organisms. To generate cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruits producing high yields of SOD for an anti-aging cosmetic material as a plant bioreactor, the CuZnSOD cDNA (mSOD1) from cassava was introduced into cucumber fruits by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the ascorbate oxidase promoter with high expression in fruits. The bialaphos-resistant shoots were selected on medium containing MS basal salts, 2 mg l−1 BA, 0.1 mg l−1 IAA, 300 mg l−1 claforan, and 2 mg l−1 bialaphos. After 6 weeks of culture on the selection medium, the shoots were transferred to MS medium containing 1 mg l−1 IAA, 300 mg l−1 claforan, 2 mg l−1 bialaphos to induce roots. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the mSOD1 gene was properly integrated into the nuclear genomes of three cucumber plants tested. The mSOD1 gene was highly expressed in the transgenic cucumber fruits, whereas it was expressed at a low level in the transgenic leaves. The SOD specific activity (units/mg protein) in transgenic fruits was approximately 3 times higher than in those of non-transgenic plants.

Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ascorbate oxidase promoter Cucumis sativus Plant bioreactor Superoxide dismutase Transformation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haeng-Soon Lee
    • 1
  • Eun-Jeong Kwon
    • 1
  • Suk-Yoon Kwon
    • 2
  • Yu-Jeong Jeong
    • 1
  • Eun-Mo Lee
    • 3
  • Man-Hyun Jo
    • 3
  • Hyun-Sook Kim
    • 3
  • In-Sik Woo
    • 3
  • Atsuhiko Shinmyo
    • 4
  • Kazuya Yoshida
    • 4
  • Sang-Soo Kwak
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Cell BiotechnologyKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB)YusongKorea
  2. 2.Laboratory of Environmental BiotechnologyKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB)YusongKorea
  3. 3.Horticulture Research DivisionChungnam Agricultural Research and Extension ServicesYusongKorea
  4. 4.Department of Cell BiologyNara Institute of Science and TechnologyIkoma, NaraJapan

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