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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 331–382 | Cite as

Recent Trends in Computer Applications in Archaeology

  • Julian D. Richards
Article
  • 532 Downloads

Abstract

Publications of computer applications in archaeology are reviewed for the period between 1990 and 1996 inclusive. The influence of technological developments on research effort is noted, and particular areas of growth are described. One of the major trends during the review period has been the increase in use of geographical information systems (GIS), but these have still to fulfill their potential. The increased uses of computers for education, communication, and electronic publication are also regarded as important growth areas.

computer applications trends 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian D. Richards
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of YorkKing's Manor, York

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