Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 377–394 | Cite as

The Relationship Between Courtship Violence and Sexual Aggression in College Students

  • Kathryn M. Ryan
Article

Abstract

The relationship between physical and sexual aggression in college students was explored in the current study. Participants were 245 males and 411 females recruited from a 2-year or 4-year college. The vast majority were white. All of them responded to a measure of physical aggression (The Conflict Tactics Scale; Straus, 1979) and sexual aggression (the Sexual Experiences Survey; Koss et al., 1987). A subset of participants also responded to a questionnaire assessing “Signs to Look for in a Battering Personality” (Ryan, 1995). Results showed a significant association between physical and sexual aggression in men and women. In addition, the combination of physical and sexual aggression produced nonsignificantly higher levels of aggression than when they occurred alone. Discriminant analyses showed verbal abuse and threats predicted both physical and sexual aggression in men and women; however, gender differences emerged on other characteristics. Finally, effect size analyses showed larger effect sizes for sexual than for physical aggression on many of the “Signs to Look for in a Battering Personality.”

courtship violence sexual aggression physical aggression college students 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn M. Ryan

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